Powder Mage Trilogy

“I would die for my country. But I’d rather kill for it. Ready your troops. We march!” (Autumn Republic by Brian McClellan)


The Autumn Republic CoverMy methods for finding books have degraded from carefully browsing bookshelves to hasty google searches. After The Autumn Republic popped up as a good fantasy series, I checked it out on Overdrive and started it without a second thought. I described the book to people as ‘dropping you right in the middle of things’, which impressed me because most fantasy authors are known for agonizingly slow world building. Yet, after McClellan summarized an absurdly complicated backstory in a half-paragraph, I checked the cover again and read the fine print (it was fine print, at least, on my phone): book three of the powder mage trilogy. I had read half of the book without even noticing that it was the finale of a trilogy.

Although this mistake doubtless says a lot about my state of mind lately, it also is indicative of the whole series’ strengths and weaknesses. The trilogy features phenomenal fight and war scenes that one can picture in matrix-like slow-motion detail and that push the reader quickly through the story line, but its recapping is so redundant that you could literally pick up the book anywhere and not be lost. McClellan also succeeds marvelously in building an original magical system, but he then feels the need to remind you of how it works in every scene. I tend to prefer fantasy that respects my ability to remember its rules and plots over the course of a few pages.

Recommended Action: BuyBorrow Now – Borrow SometimeAvoid
Length: 1,888
Ending: Abrupt, over-explained
Incidental Learning: In this new ‘flintlock’ fantasy genre, you learn more about industrial-revolution type inventions
Further Reading: If you like the war aspect, I’d go for Blood Song next. If you like the flintlock aspect, try Mistborn
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